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I am in the midst of a brief walkabout as I finished off some thoughts for this latest by Professor Turley. He’s underscored what many in my view (including myself) believe about what the Erdogan Pasha has done.

JONATHAN TURLEY

The one thing you can say about this President is that he has an impressive sense of timing. Unfortunately it tends to be bad timing.  First there was the disastrous meeting with the Russians in the wake of his firing former FBI Director James Comey.  The optics could not be worst . . . until the meeting got worse with the alleged disclosure of code name intelligence from an ally.  That meeting was held at the request of Russian president Vladimir Putin and then the Russians releases pictures taken by its state-run media organization, Tass, to the embarrassment of the Administration.  Now, after Trump has threatened to cancel daily press briefings and change libel laws to allow easier lawsuits against the media, he is meeting with one of the one of the world’s most authoritarian figures, Turkish President ­Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Trump was previously criticized for calling Erdogan to congratulate…

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An Excellent primer on leadership & Vision….a pleasure to share for my Weekly “View of the Week”….

TheBreakAway

“If art is to nourish the roots of our culture, society must set the artist free to follow his vision wherever it takes him. We must never forget that art is not a form of propaganda; it is a form of truth.”

Source: BrainPickings.com
Maria Popova

In January of 1961, as John F. Kennedy’s inauguration approached, his would-be Secretary of the Interior suggested that the poet Robert Frost participate in the ceremony as the first inaugural poet. Eighty-six-year-old Frost telegrammed Kennedy with his signature elegance of wit: “If you can bear at your age the honor of being made president of the United States, I ought to be able at my age to bear the honor of taking some part in your inauguration.” He proceeded to deliver a beautiful ode to the dream of including the arts in government, which touched Kennedy deeply.

Frost died exactly two years later…

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Leading with Trust

rosie the riveterMother’s Day 2017

Dear Leaders,

Today is a time we set aside to celebrate our mothers. Motherhood is often a thankless and tiring endeavor. It’s easy to take for granted the hard work, sacrifice, and love that moms contribute to our lives. So today we pause to appreciate the countless ways our mothers have positively influenced us and shaped us into the people we are today.

In many ways, moms are the ultimate picture of servant leadership in action. They always have the best interests of their children in mind and will go to great lengths to help them grow, develop, and succeed in life. They are able to harmonize the polarities of unconditional love and tough love, and do so in such a way that their children always know that mom has their back. Mothers are simply amazing leaders.

Using the acronym MOTHER, here are six ways leaders can…

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A challenging day awaits….Just wanted to make sure all were forewarned: Source: https://www.us-cert.gov/ncas/alerts/TA17-132A

An interesting take as I am pleased to feature this for this edition of “Vie w of the week”…..never a dull moment no doubt….

JONATHAN TURLEY

Below is my column in the Hill Newspaper on the Comey termination and comparisons to the Nixon presidency.  Those analogies deepened this weekend after the President repeated that he thinks that they should just get rid of the daily press briefings that have been such a central part of White House operations for decades.  What is most striking is how, again, the White House has engineered its own undoing.  Many people had called for Comey to be fired, particularly Democrats. However, the timing and manner of the termination has created yet another scandal for the Administration. Only 27 percent of citizens support the decision according to a NBC/Wall Street Journal poll.  The growing credibility crisis has made the appointment of a Special Prosecutor (or even the resurrection of the Independent Counsel Act) a priority for many. While I have been a dissenting voice regarding the need for a Special…

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What a beautiful Tribute..a pleasure to share

A Separate State of Mind | A Blog by Elie Fares

Over the weekend, a tragedy took place in Zahle that took the life of 24 year old Sara Sleiman whose only fault, like many before her, was being at the wrong place at the wrong time in a country that allows pests and disgusting abominations like her killer prosper unchecked.

Outside the local pub “Blue Bar,” a car accident took place that prompted Kassem El Masri to deal with the situation the only way his primordial brain knew how: fire a few rounds from his gun, one of which hit Sara and took her life soon after.

This is Sara’s killer. He’s the kind of brainless Lebanese men whose entire existence can be summarized with how they can express their manliness better, which is why you see him pose with guns and bazookas, because he can.

Kassem El Masri is also known as Tah El Masri (in Arabic: طه المصري). He’s a known…

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It is a rainy and beautiful AM here in Southern California. A pleasure to share this weekly “View of the Week” on my Corner in WordPrss to underscore how not everything is Unwell in the Middle East Right now…..Onward to the New Week!! 🙂 🙂

A Separate State of Mind | A Blog by Elie Fares

I’m sick of Western journalist coming into the country with their preconceptions in place and then going out of their way to find the right people for them to make sure they propagate those exact beliefs back onto their core audience.

I haven’t been discussing BBC Pop Up’s reports much, mostly because I’ve found them to be just another regurgitation of a lot of previous reporting on the issues they’re tackling. But then the crew of BBC Pop Up decided to visit the capital of North Lebanon, Tripoli, against all advice – or so they’d make you believe after all the Beirutis they know told them it was dangerous and unvisitable.

But our brave, courageous crew decided to risk their lives – hilarious – and visit Tripoli. They probably didn’t know that the most dangerous thing that could happen to them in the city is an overdose on sugar and an increased…

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Disturbing to say the least 😦

JONATHAN TURLEY

donald_trump_president-elect_portrait_croppedBelow is my column this week on the confirmation from both Trump’s Chief of Staff and the White House Spokesperson that the Administration is working on possible changes in our libel laws — changes that by definition would require altering the First Amendment.  The decision in New York Times v. Sullivan is decades old and celebrated as one of the Court’s greatest decisions.  It has never been challenged by a president . . . until now.  The case clearly states that the libel standard is a constitutional rule and thus the Court would have to overturned the decision or the President would have to amend the First Amendment.  Whatever must be shown under the “actual malice” standard of New York Times v. Sullivan, it pales in comparison to the actual malice shown by this Administration toward the free press.  Here is the column:

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On the of midweek as I tend to commitments for http://www.thedialyoutsider.com, another good one from Professor Turley that underscores the long-term implications of such rhetoric with profound consequences for America’s Standing in the World…..

JONATHAN TURLEY

1600px-Jean-Leon_Gerome_Pollice_VersoWilbur_Ross_Official_PortraitThere has been considerable criticism over Trump’s description of the bombing of Syria over a dinner with Chinese President Xi where he seemed to have as much recollection of the chocolate cake as he did the decision itself. (“I was sitting at the table. We had finished dinner. We’re now having dessert.  And we had the most beautiful piece of chocolate cake that you’ve ever seen, and President Xi was enjoying it.”)  That comment now looks decidedly presidential in comparison to the comment made by his dinner mate at Mar-a-Lago, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross that the bombing of Syria: “It was in lieu of after-dinner entertainment.”  Even as a joke, speaking of acts of war like they are versions of the Roman games is distasteful.  Even missile strikes involve American sailors or soldiers and airman placing themselves into harm’s way.  Having them referred to as “entertainment” at a conference by a…

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Another perceptive Thought 4 the week….

A Separate State of Mind | A Blog by Elie Fares

Make sure you download this blog’s iOS app to stay up to date! (Link). 

The saga of the sure and constant destruction of any historical remnants of Beirut continue. The city, which is constantly listed among the world’s oldest continuously inhabited locales, is having progressively less things to show for its history as the Lebanese government and everyone involved in governance seems not to care the least about that particular aspect of the city, treating it with as much carelessness as you could imagine… and then some.

Picture this: if you go near Biel, in the recently built Beirut Waterfront area, you will stumble on an archeological discovery that most countries around the world can’t even boast about having: between 400 to 500 roman columns are found there, thrown away by the sea, waiting for kingdom come to do its job.

Of course, it’s not a discovery per se…

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